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Safety

Do not cross the track. A train is approaching

Track

At the balcony

The Safety! exhibition traces the development of railway safety from the earliest, primitive signals in the 1840s to the introduction of automatic train control (ATC) in the late 1990s.

The museum's COVID-19 guidelines

Safety has always been of crucial importance to the railway. Thankfully, railway accidents are relatively rare, but when they do happen, the losses to human life and rolling stock tend to be considerable, attracting huge publicity.

Since the mid-1800s, train travel has been one of the safest forms of travel and it remains so today. This is the starting point of the exhibition Safety! which focuses on the management and control that we do not notice but which coordinate tremendous forces.

A pamphlet in English relating to the exhibition is available at the ticket counter.

Safety! on the Balcony

Trace the development from the earliest, primitive signals in the 1840s to the introduction of automatic train control (ATC) in the late 1990s

Trace the development from the earliest, primitive signals in the 1840s to the introduction of automatic train control (ATC) in the late 1990s

The station clock from the early part of the 1900s is in all likelihood from Taastrup Station. Since the infancy of the railway, all stations had a clock in a prominent position to show the correct time at all times

The station clock from the early part of the 1900s is in all likelihood from Taastrup Station. Since the infancy of the railway, all stations had a clock in a prominent position to show the correct time at all times

Mechanical lever frame from 1910 for moving the tracks and setting the signals, manufactured by Siemens & Halske.

Mechanical lever frame from 1910 for moving the tracks and setting the signals, manufactured by Siemens & Halske.

Safety improvements

Denmark’s railway history spans almost 175 years – since 1847 – and safety has always been at the top of the agenda. Over the years, safety has steadily improved. Initially dependent on people, railway safety has increasingly become automated, eliminating the human factor to the extent possible.

The Safety! exhibition explores what the railway operators learnt from accidents, such as the express train accident near Odense in 1967 and the Sorø accident in 1988. It also provides detailed information on the operation of manual, mechanical and electronic safety systems.