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21 tracks of railway history

Step on board with us from 1847 and till today

Track

Track 1-21

The Danish Railway Museum is housed in an authentic engine-shed from 1954. The building has 21 tracks and was originally built as a depot for the Danish State Railways (DSB) and the private railway companies of North Fyn. These days, the engine-shed is a wonderful exhibition space, providing an authentic and industrial environment in which visitors can experience Danish railway history at close quarters.

The museum's COVID-19 guidelines

The exhibition features an impressive range of iconic engines and carriages, among them Denmark’s oldest preserved steam engine, the H40, from 1868. The exhibited engines and carriages trace the development of Danish railway history. Visitors may step inside many of the engines and carriages:

  • Try sitting on one of the uncomfortable Third Class benches in the old passenger coaches
  • Climb inside the double-decker coach which brought Copenhageners to Dyrehaven, a forest park north of Copenhagen, at the beginning of the twentieth century
  • Be inside the goods waggon when it is loaded
  • See postal workers sorting letters while under way
  • Get into the driver’s cab of Denmark’s largest steam engine, the E engine

On the last two tracks, the Museum has a workshop which you can see from the balcony of the building. On the balcony, you also get a chronological presentation of the development of the railway in Denmark, based on the Museum’s unique collection of models, paintings, photographs and various other items. You will also find a cafe and the Children’s Railway Station on the balcony.

 

Come inside

Climb inside the double-decker coach which brought Copenhageners to Dyrehaven, a forest park north of Copenhagen, at the beginning of the twentieth century

Climb inside the double-decker coach which brought Copenhageners to Dyrehaven, a forest park north of Copenhagen, at the beginning of the twentieth century

You can get into many carriages and engines, for example the driver’s cab of the E engine

You can get into many carriages and engines, for example the driver’s cab of the E engine

In the mail van, postal workers sorting letters while under way

In the mail van, postal workers sorting letters while under way

The Museum is housed in authentic premises, an engine-shed from 1954

The Museum is housed in authentic premises, an engine-shed from 1954

Step inside the meat van

Step inside the meat van

Railway workers are loading parcels and suitcases on to a luggage van

Railway workers are loading parcels and suitcases on to a luggage van

The Museum has a large outdoor area. Look at the turntable and get a sense of the characteristic shape of the engine-shed

The Museum has a large outdoor area. Look at the turntable and get a sense of the characteristic shape of the engine-shed

The balcony provides a great view of the many engines and carriages

The balcony provides a great view of the many engines and carriages

Look closely and enjoy the many beautiful details on the exhibits

Look closely and enjoy the many beautiful details on the exhibits

The motor trolley is from 1933 and was used on the Skagen Line

The motor trolley is from 1933 and was used on the Skagen Line

An outdoor museum

The Museum has a large outdoor area around the old engine-shed. Here you get a good impression of the characteristic shape of the engine-shed; you can also see the turntable wherefrom countless carriages and engines have been shunted in and out of the engine-shed.

We also have a fully functional coal store and a water crane which supply our steam engines with coal and water when they are going to be used.

Large and small trains

At Queen Louise’s Station, the Museum has even its own platform where various carriages and engines are exhibited. This is also where, on selected days, we offer vintage train rides to our visitors on the Museum’s own railway section.

Our youngest visitors are likely to enjoy our large and very popular play area. We also focus on children’s perspective, offering mini-train rides around Denmark.

The Museum’s exhibitions and daily activities make it easy to spend half a day on a visit to the Danish Railway Museum.